Sashiko Story - Japanese traditional clothing Samue(Samugi) online boutique

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Materials we use

We provide you various kinds of samue and Japanese traditional clothing. There are many words even unfamiliar for Japanese people. So, please refer to our “Material dictionary” if you want to know the meaning of unfamiliar words.

Materials
Wool
Quilt
Hemp
Silk
Dungaree
Japanese traditional weaving
Sha
Ryo or Ro
Kurume Textile
Sashiko-weaving

Dyeing
Reactive dye
Kasuri
Styles
Haori
Hanten
Hanjuban


[Materials]

Wool

WoolGenerally wool is the hair of sheep, but it could also mean the hair of goat and alpaca. Wool is resilient fiber. It resists water on the surface, but it absorbs water inside. It holds warmth because the fibers of wool twine around and hold air. It is light and warm, therefore often used for the winter clothes and blankets.


Quilt

QuiltQuilt is a kind of cloth that is quilted. Quilting is a technique that stuffs cotton or wool between the two cloths and sew them together with decorative stitches. Quilted cloths keep warmth.


Hemp

HempHemp is a kind of textile or fiber, which is made of hemp. Hemp thread is made from stalk skin of hemp. Hemps are originally come from middle Asia and it is cultivated from the torrid zones to the temperate zones. People used to squeeze oil from the seeds of hemp and it was the necessity of everyday life. The texture and breath ability of hemp textile is the best suited for summer.


Silk

SilkSilk is a fiber made from a substance produced by silkworms, or a textile made of the fiber. It is considered as one of the highest quality materials all over the world. It is brilliant and resilient, and looks wonderful when it is dyed. The spinning process is; silk warms spin cocoons after four times of molting. Then kill the warms by heat and boil the cocoons to spin a silk thread. The thickness of a thread is very fine (1 micron millimeter) and each cocoon has two threads. Putting several threads together and finally a silk thread accomplish.


Dungaree

DungareeDungaree is a kind of denim that is woven from dyed thread for the weft and white thread for the warp. It has named after its place of origin, Dungaree of India.



[Japanese traditional weaving]

Sha

ShaSha is a Japanese word for gauze. Silk Sha is often used for making Haori and other Japanese clothes for summer because of its lightness and thinness. Sha can be said as the pronoun of summer kimono.


Ryo or Ro

Ryo or RoRyo or Ro is a kind of silk gauze. The warp and the weft are entangled. Ryo or Ro is also often used for summer clothing. Ryo or Ro and Sha are the two greatest textile of summer. Superb sheerness, coolness and dryness can be felt from this textile.


Kurume Textile

Kurume TextileKurume textile is the textile made in Kurume city, the southeast part of Fukuoka prefecture. Kurume has deep history of textile such as “Kurume gasuri” and “Kurume Jima”, which inherit from Edo period, and the name of the city is famous for textile.


Sashiko-weaving

Sashiko-weavingSashiko-weaving is a textile that is imitated sashiko embroidery. Sashiko embroidery is a technique to make stronger cloths by sewing layered cloths together and is used for Judo and Kendo uniform. Sashiko-weaving usually means the fabric that is woven the warp and the weft spaced from the surface on the flat textile in order to make the patterns.



[Dyeing]

Reactive dye

Reactive dyeReactive dye is a dyeing technique, which does not kill the original texture of the textile and is known as the most last long among the dyeing methods of cotton. By heating, the positive ingredient of the fabric called cellulose reacts with dyestuff. Therefore the color dyed by reactive dye last long and does not fade by washing.


Kasuri

KasuriThread used for Kasuri is the thread that is dyed with binding tightly to make patterns. Kasuri patterns are used for Tsumugi, cotton Kasuri and hemp textile. The patterns look as if it is scratched. The patterns express the beauty.



[Styles]

Haori

HaoriHaori is a short-length outer for kimono and samue. It is a jacket for cold weather and for formal situations. Wearing haori expands the variations of kimono and samue style.


Hanten

HantenHanten is a casual version of Haori. There is no collar, gussets or strings on the chest part. “Han” is a Japanese word for “half” and it is named Hanten because it covers only upper body. Hanten started to be worn since 18th century and it became popular because the reformation of Tenpo (1841 ? 1843) banned women to wear haori.


Hanjuban

HanjubanHanjuban is underwear for traditional Japanese clothing. It is usually worn with haneri, the collar that layers from inside of kimono and samue. We provide convenient hanjuban that already sewed haneri on it.